How to Start a Prayer Support Team

prayerWhen it comes to prayer support, there is no such thing as too much.  I’ve never met a Christian leader, paid or volunteer, who complained because they had too many people praying for them, too often, or with too much passion.  If you  need more prayer support, you may want to form a prayer support team.

A few years ago I read The Book of Church Growth by Thom Rainer.   In a chapter on the power of prayer, Rainer listed 6 potential facets of a church-wide prayer ministry.  One of those ideas was to organize a team of prayer warriors called the “Pastor’s Intercessory Prayer Partners” who were devoted to pray for their pastor and his ministry on a daily basis.  Over the past few years I’ve taken this idea and put it to use in my own ministry with some modifications.  I call my team the “Pastor’s Prayer Team,” but you don’t have to be a pastor or a church staff member to benefit from this approach.  You could use it with your Bible study group, international mission ministry, or non-profit organization.  All you need is a ministry, a group of people who are willing to pray for you, and a way to communicate with them.  Here is a 5-step process for starting or improving your own prayer support team.

1. Teach and model the importance of prayer.

Jesus did more than just talk about prayer. He taught his disciples how pray and modeled prayer in the Garden of Gethsemane among other places (Luke 11:1-13, Matthew 26:36-46).  People will not be motivated to pray if they don’t know how to pray or why prayer is important.  They will not be eager to join you in pray if they are not convinced that you are passionate and persistent in your own prayer life.

2.  Ask people to commit.

Some people are not ready or willing to join a prayer support team, but some are!  Those who are willing are just waiting for your invitation.  This can be done in a number of ways, but I would recommend doing it in writing so you have a list of people for follow-up. Depending on your situation you could use a sign-up sheet, a commitment card, but I prefer email.  I ask those who are interested in joining the team to send me an email to let me know.  Then, I use those email addresses to send a return email acknowledging their request and to build a distribution list for future use.

I do not ask my prayer support team members to commit to a specific frequency of prayer.  Instead, I ask them to pray for me, my family, and my ministry on a “regular” basis. If that ends up being daily, great; if it ends up being once a week or every other week, I’ll take it.  My goal is to equip and organize people to pray.  I don’t want to discourage anyone from participating just because they can not make a daily commitment.

3. Share regular praises and prayer requests.

Once again, this can be suited to your situation.  You can send out regular praise and prayer requests via “snail mail,” email, or social media.  They could also be added to a newsletter, either in print or online.  I choose to use email because it is faster and easier than “snail mail,” but more manageable and accessible for the people on my team.

Praises should be shared along with prayer requests because people like to hear good news along with your needs.  Sharing praises is a way of thanking your team for their prayer as well as reminding them that prayer really does make a difference.

Every ministry has its own cycle.  A non-profit organization or missions ministry may operate best on a quarterly or monthly cycle.  The local church runs on a weekly cycle, so I try to send out my praise and prayer requests on a weekly basis.  Whatever your frequency, let your team know your intentions and stick to them.

4.  Be humble and transparent.

This is not as much of a step as it is a general principle.  One of the pitfalls of kingdom work, especially if it is perceived as successful, is pride.  Pride causes us to keep others at a comfortable distance because we are afraid they might see our flaws.  This simply will not work with a prayer support team.  Put yourself in the shoes of one of your team members.  Would you be motived to pray regularly for someone who came across as superficial or fake?  This does not mean you should share every sin and struggle with your team.  It does mean, however, that you need to be open and honest about your needs

5.  Show gratitude and appreciation

Who doesn’t like a little appreciation for their efforts?  Being a part of a prayer support team is usually something that is done behind the scenes.  In order to keep your team inspired and engaged, you need to let them know they are not alone and they are making a difference in your life and ministry.  You should tell your prayer support team how much you appreciate them every time you share your praises and prayer requests. You may also want to send a separate “thank you” note sometime throughout the year.  If you use email like I do, you may choose to send a “pen-and-paper note” for emphasis.  If possible, you could organize a reception once a year to recognize your prayer support team and let them interact with each other.

What methods have you found effective for recruiting prayer support?  Have you ever formed a prayer support team?  How have you benefited from the process?

Devotional Thoughts for Leaders: Leading By Example

004-jesus-washes-feetJohn  13:1-20
Jesus knew that his time was short when he gathered with his disciples to celebrate the Feast of Passover.  So he got up from the meal and surprised them by setting aside his outer garment and wrapped a towel around his waist like a lowly servant.  Then, he proceeded to wash the disciples’ dusty, dirty feet.  When Peter objected, Jesus told Peter that he must be washed if he was to have anything to do with Jesus.
When Jesus finished, he returned to the table and questioned the disciples about what had just happened.  Jesus told them that they were right to revere him as their Rabbi and Lord, but he went on to explain that leaders in God’s kingdom, must be servants as well as leaders.  Then, he commanded them to follow the example he just given them of washing on another’s feet.
The thing that stands out about this passage is not just what Jesus said, but how he said it.  In the closing days of Jesus’ earthy ministry, he taught his disciples about the important of humility in leadership.  But he did much more than teach them or instruct them to serve others; he modeled it for them.  He led by example.
Today’s Christian leaders would do well to support their directives, teaching, or instructions with a consistent example.  Leadership is not just what you say, but how you act.  It is as true in the conference room as it is in the pulpit – “Practice what you preach.”
Here are some questions to help you lead by example:
Are you sending any mixed messages in your leadership?  Are you telling people to do one thing, but then doing another thing yourself?  What can you do that fix that?
How can you adjust your leadership style to “show” as much as you “tell?”  Are their lessons or principles that you are trying to communicate right now that need to be experience as well as explained?

Five Reasons Churches Struggle with Conflict

Conflict_Resolution_00It is sad to say, but church and conflict seem to go together like peanut butter and jelly.  The long running joke is that churches split over anything and everything, including something as insignificant to God’s kingdom as the color of the carpet.   But have you ever stopped to wonder why?  Here are five reasons why churches struggle with conflict:

1. Church members and leaders aren’t equipped to resolve conflict in a healthy way.

Disagreements are inevitable in ministry, but seminaries provide little training on conflict resolution.  Since church leaders are not equipped to handle conflict effectively they don’t teach church members those skills.  The conflict resolution skills that do exist in the church are either unintentionally brought in from some outside experience or sought out after failed attempts at handling conflict successfully.

2.  Church members and leaders would rather ignore conflict than acknowledge it.

Everyone has their own personality.  When it comes to conflict, many people would rather pretend that conflict doesn’t exist rather than do something about it.  This approach might seem easy at first, but it always seems to make things more difficult and destructive in the end.

3.  Church members and leaders bring years of unresolved conflict along with them.

The two previous reasons are compounded by the way church members and leaders move from church to church. When a new pastor or a new church member joins a church, they can bring their unresolved struggles. When these old struggles are layered over and combined with new conflicts it can be difficult to find solid emotional ground.

4.  Poor leadership development and placement systems allow immature people positions of power.

Churches that have lost people through poorly managed conflict can be eager for “new recruits.”  If these new members are talented or charming they can be thrust into positions of authority or influence without the proper preparation.  The same can be true for members who have been around for a long time.  These “veterans” can be given similar positions in the church with little thought to their spiritual maturity, giftedness, or character.  Both scenarios perpetuate conflict by placing people who are unable to handle conflict in a situation where they are sure to encounter it.

5.  Satan is the father of deception and he works to sow conflict in the church.

From the very beginning, Satan has been working to divide and conquer.  The half-truths that he told in the Garden of Eden left Adam and Eve in conflict with God and with each other.  Satan is still alive and well, sowing dissension and division among God’s people.  If you look carefully, you can find dishonesty, distrust, and pride at the root of most church conflicts today.

The Gospel is a message of reconciliation.  It tells us how sinful humans can be reconciled to a holy God and through that restored relationship, reconciled to each other.  As we train new leaders and equip more people to follow Jesus Christ, we need to help them acknowledge conflict in the church and resolve it effectively.  We also need to be aware of Satan’s corrupting influence.

What about you?  Have you noticed any others reasons why churches struggle with conflict?