What Can I Do While I Wait?

God recently led me and my family into a time of transition. This transition includes a change of jobs (for me), a change of cities (for all of us), and a change of schools (for my kids). Changes can be exciting, but they are also stressful.

Our move has taken longer than originally anticipated. That requires a lot of patience and persistence. It has also caused me to ask, “What can I do to maximize this time in my life?”

I believe that God has a purpose for everything that happens to us in life – the good as well as the bad. This delay is part of God’s plan for me so I want make the most of it. I also don’t want to become passive, wasting the days I have between now and whenever.

You may also be experiencing a season of delay. You are tried of sitting on the sidelines and you want to make the most of your time. What can you do while you wait?

  1. Learn Something New. Transitions and delays are a great times to upgrade your knowledge or skills. Read a book or take a class. Take a trip or start a new hobby. Israel’s King David learned all kinds of things while he waited to ascend to the throne.
  2. Grow Your Faith. Abraham and Sarah waited for 25 years for a biological son. They made several mistakes along the way, but they eventually saw God’s promise come true. They exercised their faith in ways they never thought possible when they began their journey with God.
  3. Rest and Relax. Life can be hectic and draining. We don’t always take advantage of the natural rhythms of life that God had provided to sustain us. Waiting forces us to slow down for a season which can provided some much needed rest. Jesus expected a lot out of His disciples, but He also showed them how to rest.
  4. Reconnect with Loved Ones. Social media and electronics have given us the false impression that we can stay in touch with everyone all the time. That is simply not possible because there are only so many hours in the day. Season of delay might be just what you need to look up someone you haven’t seen in awhile. The apostle Paul used the transitions between his mission trips to reconnect with the believers that sent him out into ministry.
  5. Seek Clarity. This might be the toughest option because you may not be able to get the kind of clarity you are hoping for. Sometimes God explains the reasons for delay and sometimes the rationale doesn’t come until later. Nevertheless, it never a bad idea to lean into your relationship with and ask Him for wisdom and understanding.

Don’t have to waste your wait! Use it as an opportunity to prepare for what’s next. Use it as an opportunity to partner with God.

What else would you suggest to someone who is experiencing a time of transition? Join the conversation and leave your comment below.

Devotional Thoughts for Leaders: Ministry Transitions

Paul's mapActs 13 is the transition point between the Apostle Peter’s ministry “in Jerusalem, Judea, and Samaria” in the first half of the book and the soon to be Apostle Paul’s ministry “to the ends of the earth” in the second half.  The church at Antioch was the first major church planted in those “ends” and things were going well.  The church was growing fast and being discipled.  Their leadership team, which included Barnabas and Saul, grew too, from 2 to 5 in just a few years.

But one day everything changed.  While the church was “ministering to the Lord and fasting” the Holy Spirit sent orders for Barnabas and Saul to leave and set out for a new work.  The leadership dream team was broken up and the church at Antioch had to adjust.

As the rest of the Barnabas and Paul’s ministry played out in the book of Acts, it’s important to realize God removed them from a good situation and placed them in a better one.  God led both men, especially Paul, into an unprecedented mission ministry throughout the known world.  Not only did Paul plant church all over the known world, he wrote half the New Testament.  But none of that would have happened if they hadn’t left Antioch.

Changing your ministry responsiblity or location can be hard, but it helps to remember that when God removes us from a good situation, He places us in an even better one.  And sometimes that situation is even better than we can imagine.